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George Orwell published

The list of works about and by Orwell

Orwell Novels

Entries in the novels, nonfiction books, and booklets / pamphlets sections are listed by date of first publication and alphabetically.

  1. “Burmese Days” — New York: Harper & Brothers, 1934.
  2. “A Clergyman's Daughter” — London: V. Gollancz ltd., 1935.
  3. “Keep the Aspidistra Flying” — London: V. Gollancz, ltd., 1936.
  4. “Coming Up for Air” — London: V. Gollancz, ltd., 1939.
  5. “Animal Farm” — London: Secker & Warburg, 1945.
  6. “Nineteen Eighty-Four” — London: Secker & Warburg, 1949.

Orwell Nonfiction Books

  1. “Down and Out in Paris and London” — London: V. Gollancz ltd., 1933.
  2. “The Road to Wigan Pier” — London: V. Gollancz ltd., 1937.
  3. “Homage to Catalonia” — London: Secker & Warburg, 1938.

Orwell Pamphlets / Booklets

  1. “The English People” — London: Collins, 1947.
    A six-part booklet, with the following sections:
    – England at First Glance;
    – The Moral Outlook of the English People;
    – The Political Outlook of the English People;
    – The English Class System;
    – The English Language;
    – The Future of the English People.
  2. “James Burnham and the Managerial Revolution” — London: Socialist Book Centre, 1946.
    A pamphlet printing of:
    – “Second Thoughts on James Burnham”.
  3. “The Lion and the Unicorn” “Socialism and the English Genius” — London: Secker & Warburg, 1941.
    This booklet contains three parts:
    – England Your England(*);
    – Shopkeepers at War;
    – The English Revolution.
    *) “England Your England” was later reprinted as a separate essay in various collections.

Orwell Essays / Articles

Entries in all sections include both regular and sporadic periodical contributions, titled book reviews, and several introductions to, and essays in books. Entries that are in whole or in part book reviews are indicated by a (r). Entries are listed by date of first publication (the publication listed first) and alphabetically. Many of these essays can be found as / in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell (1968), abbreviated from now on as CEJL. However, essays included in these main collections are cross-referenced by the following abbreviations (the first publishing year in brackets):

In addition, Orwell broadcast several of his essays on the BBC. These are noted with the broadcast date, if available.

1929
“A Farthing Newspaper.” G. K.'s Weekly. 29 December 1928. CEJL
1930
“A Good ‘Middle.’” Adelphi. October 1930. (r)
1931
“Carlyle.” Adelphi. March 1931. (r)
“Poverty - Plain and Coloured.” Adelphi. April 1931. (r)
“The Spike.” Adelphi. April 1931. Appears in revised form in chapters 27 and 35 of Down and Out in Paris and London. CEJL
“A Hanging.” Adelphi. August 1931. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Hop-Picking.” New Statesman and Nation. 17 October 1931. CEJL
1932
“Common Lodging Houses.” New Statesman and Nation. 3 September 1932. CEJL
“Clink.” Written in August 1932. Not published in Orwell's lifetime. Orwell incorporated this in revised form into Down and Out in Paris and London. CEJL
1935
“Introduction.” La Vache Enragee. (French edition of Down and Out in Paris and London) Paris: Gallimard, 1935. CEJL
1936
“Rudyard Kipling.” New English Weekly. 23 January 1936. (titled in CEJL [On Kipling's Death]) CEJL
“Real Adventure.” Time and Tide. 18 July 1936. (r)
“Treasure and Travel.” Time and Tide. 11 July 1936. (r)
“Five Travellers.” Time and Tide. 12 September 1936. (r)
“Shooting an Elephant.” New Writing. Autumn 1936. (broadcast on the BBC Home Service: October 12, 1948) SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Travel Round and Down.” Time and Tide. 17 October 1936. (r)
“In Defence of the Novel.” New English Weekly. 12 and 19 November 1936. CEJL
“Desert and Islands.” Time and Tide. 21 November 1936. (r)
“Bookshop Memories.” Fortnightly. November 1936. CEJL
“Propagandist Critics.” New English Weekly. 31 December 1936. (r)
1937
“Spanish Nightmare.” Time and Tide. 31 July 1937. (r)
“Spilling the Spanish Beans.” New English Weekly. 29 July and 2 September 1937. CEJL
“Experientia Docet.” New Statesman and Nation. 28 August 1937. (r)
“Eye-witness in Barcelona.” Controversy. August 1937.
“More News from Tartary.” Time and Tide. 4 September 1937. (r)
“Spain: Today and Yesterday.” Time and Tide. 9 October 1937. (r)
“Back to the Twenties.” New English Weekly. 21 October 1937. (r)
“Excursions in Autobiography.” Time and Tide. 6 November 1937. (r)
“Our Own Have-Nots.” Time and Tide. 27 November 1937. (r)
“Spanish Quintet.” Time and Tide. 11 December 1937. (r)
“The Lure of Profundity.” New English Weekly. 30 December 1937. (r)
1938
“Terror in Spain.” Time and Tide. 5 February 1938. (r)
“Eyes Left, Dress!” New English Weekly. 17 February 1938. (r)
“Impenetrable Mystery.” New English Weekly. 9 June 1938. (r)
“Authentic Socialism.” New English Weekly. 16 June 1938. (r)
“The Lure of Atrocity.” New English Weekly. 23 June 1938. (r)
“Why I Joined the Independent Labour Party.” New Leader. 24 June 1938. CEJL
“The Spanish Tragedy.” Time and Tide. 16 July 1938. (r)
“Stalinism and Aristocracy.” New English Weekly. 21 July 1938. (r)
“Franz Borkenau on the Communist International.” New English Weekly. 22 September 1938. (r)
“Political Reflections on the Crisis.” Adelphi. December 1938.
“Will Gypsies Survive?” Adelphi. December 1938. (r)
1939
“The Russian Regime.” New English Weekly. 12 January 1939. (r)
“A Catholic Confronts Communism.” Peace News. 27 January 1939.
“The Taming of Power.” Adelphi. January 1939. (r)
“A Symposium...Upon Professor John Macmurray's...'The Clue to History.'” Adelphi. February 1939.
“Not Counting Niggers.” Adelphi. July 1939. CEJL (r)
“About It and About.” Time and Tide. 12 August 1939. (r)
“The Book Racket.” Adelphi. September 1939. (r)
“Democracy in the British Army.” Left Forum. September 1939. CEJL
“Looking Before and After.” Time and Tide. 21 October 1939. (r)
“Good Travellers.” Time and Tide. 2 December 1939. (r)
“The Spanish War.” Adelphi. December 1939.
“Marrakech.” New Writing. Christmas 1939. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“Charles Dickens.” Written in 1939. ITW, CrE/DD, CE, CEJL
1940
“Moscow and Madrid.” Time and Tide. 20 January 1940. (r)
“Democrat and Dictators.” Time and Tide. 17 February 1940. (r)
“Ruth Pitter's Poetry.” Adelphi. February 1940. (r)
“The Lessons of War.” Horizon. February 1940. (r)
“We Are Observed!” Time and Tide. 2 March 1940. (r)
“Hitler.” New English Weekly. 21 March 1940. (r)
“Notes on the Way.” Time and Tide. 30 March and 6 April 1940. CEJL (r)
“Boys” Weeklies.” Horizon. March 1940. ITW, CrE/DD, CE, CEJL
“Entre Chien et Loup.” Time and Tide. 13 April 1940. (r)
“The Limit to Pessimism.” New English Weekly. 25 April 1940. CEJL (r)
“Havelock Ellis.” Adelphi. May 1940. (r)
“Theatre.” A regular theatre review column for Time and Tide from May 1940 to August 1941.
“Mr. Joad's Point of View.” Time and Tide. 8 June 1940. (r)
“Red, White, and Brown.” Time and Tide. 4 July 1940. (r)
“Prophecies of Fascism.” Tribune. 12 July 1940. CEJL
“On the Brink.” New Statesman and Nation. 13 July 1940. (r)
“England With the Knobs Off.” Adelphi. July 1940. (r)
“Charles Reade.” New Statesman and Nation. 17 August 1940. CEJL (r)
“Current Literature: Books in General.” New Statesman and Nation. 17 August 1940.
“The English Civil War.” New Statesman and Nation. 24 August 1940. (r)
“Holding Out.” New Statesman and Nation. 14 September 1940. (r)
“Public Schoolboys.” Time and Tide. 14 September 1940. (r)
“History Books.” New Statesman and Nation. 21 September 1940. (r)
“Wishful Thinking and the Light Novel.” New Statesman and Nation. 19 October 1940. (r)
“Films.” A regular movie review column for Time and Tide from October 1940 through August 1941.
“Mis-Observation.” New Statesman and Nation. 26 October 1940. (r)
“Fiction and Life.” Time and Tide. 9 November 1940. (r)
“By-Words.” New Statesman and Nation. 16 November 1940. (r)
“At School and on Holiday.” Time and Tide. 7 December 1940. (r)
“Guerillas.” New Statesman and Nation. 14 December 1940. (r)
“The Proletarian Writer.” Listener. 19 December 1940. (broadcast on the Home Service of the BBC: December 6, 1940) CEJL
“Franco Spain.” Time and Tide. 21 December 1940. (r)
“Inside the Whale.” New Directions in Prose and Poetry. 1940. ITW, SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL (r)
“My Country Right or Left.” Folios of New Writing. Autumn 1940. CEJL
“New Words.” Written in 1940. CEJL
“The Ruling Class.” Horizon. December 1940. (included in The Lion and the Unicorn)
1941
“Two Glimpses of the Moon.” New Statesman and Nation. 18 January 1941. (r)
“Our Opportunity.” Left News. January 1941.
“London Letter.” A regular column for the Partisan Review from January 1941 to Summer 1946. The letters discuss the implications of the changing political and military situation for Britain and America.
“The People's Victory.” New Statesman and Nation. 15 February 1941. (r)
“The Bayonet in War.” Spectator. 21 March 1941.
“Will Freedom Die with Capitalism?” Left News. April 1941.
“The Frontiers of Art and Propaganda.” Listener. 29 May 1941. (broadcast on the BBC Overseas Service: April 30, 1941) CEJL
“Tolstoy and Shakespeare.” Listener. 5 June 1941. (broadcast on the BBC Overseas Service: May 7, 1941) CEJL
“The Meaning of a Poem.” Listener. 12 June 1941. (broadcast on the BBC Overseas Service: May 14, 1941) CEJL
“Literature and Totalitarianism.” Listener. 19 June 1941. (broadcast on the BBC Overseas Service) CEJL
“Spaniard in Spain.” Time and Tide. 28 June 1941. (r)
“English Writing in Total War.” New Republic. 14 July 1941.
“The Romantic Case.” Observer. 23 July 1941. (r)
“Wells, Hitler and the World State.” Horizon. August 1941. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL (r)
“The Art of Donald McGill.” Horizon. September 1941. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL
“No, Not One.” Adelphi. October 1941. CEJL (r)
“Fascism and Democracy.” The Betrayal of the Left. Ed. V. Gollancz. London: V. Gollancz, 1941.
“Foreword.” The End of the ‘Old School Tie.’ By T. C. Worsley. London: Secker & Warburg, 1941.
“Introduction.” Love of Life. By Jack London. London: Elek, 1941.
“Patriots and Revolutionaries.” The Betrayal of the Left. Ed. V. Gollancz. London: V. Gollancz, 1941.
“Socialists Answer Our Questions on the War.” Left News. November 1941.
1942
“Nicholas Moore vs. George Orwell.” Partisan Review. January-February 1942.
“Rudyard Kipling.” Horizon. February 1942. CrE/DD, OR, CE, CEJL (r)
“The Rediscovery of Europe.” Listener. 19 March 1942. (broadcast on the BBC Eastern Service: March 10, 1942) Reprinted in Talking to India, 1943. CEJL
“An American Critic.” Observer. 10 May 1942. (r)
“The British Crisis.” Partisan Review. June-July 1942.
“Portrait of the General.” Observer. 2 August 1942. (r)
“Pacifism and the War.” Partisan Review. August-September 1942.
“Portrait of an Addict.” Observer. 13 September 1942. (r)
“Thomas Hardy Looks at War.” Tribune. 18 September 1942. (r)
“Jonathan Swift.” Listener. November 1942. (broadcast on the BBC: November 2, 1942)
“Background of French Morocco.” Tribune. 20 November 1942.
“Perfide Albion.” New Statesman and Nation. 21 November 1942. (r)
“In the Darlan Country.” Observer. 29 November 1942.
“The End of Henry Miller.” Tribune. 4 December 1942.
“Autobiographical Note.” Twentieth Century Authors. Ed. Stanley J. Kunitz and H. Haycraft. New York: W. H. Wilson and Co., 1942. CEJL
“Culture and Democracy.” Victory or Vested Interest? By G. D. H. Cole and others. London: Routledge, 1942.
1943
“Pamphlet Literature.” New Statesman and Nation. 9 January 1943. CEJL
“W. B. Yeats.” Horizon. January 1943. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL (r)
“Letter to an Indian.” Tribune. 19 March 1943. (r)
“Not Enough Money.” Tribune. 2 April 1943.
“Note to ‘Whitehall's Road to Mandalay’ by Robert Duval.” Tribune. 2 April 1943.
“The Way of a Poet.” Time and Tide. 17 April 1943. (r)
“Burma.” Tribune. 23 April 1943.
“Three Years of Home Guard.” Observer. 9 May 1943.
“Nationalism.” Tribune. 14 May 1943.
“Literature and the Left.” Tribune. 4 June 1943. CEJL
“War in Burma.” New Statesman and Nation. 14 August 1943. (r)
“Where to Go - But How?” Observer. 15 August 1943. (r)
“The Faith of Thomas Mann.” Tribune. 10 September 1943.
“Paris Is Not France.” Observer. 12 September 1943. (r)
“Gandhi in Mayfair.” Horizon. September 1943. (r)
“Revolt in the Urban Desert.” Observer. 10 October 1943. (r)
“Who are the War Criminals?” Tribune. 22 October 1943. CEJL
“Out of Step.” Observer. 7 November 1943. (r)
“Mark Twain - the Licensed Jester.” Tribune. 26 November 1943. CEJL
“Hidden Spain.” Observer. 28 November 1943. (r)
“Wandering Star.” Observer. 19 December 1943. (r)
“Looking Back on the Spanish War.” New Road. 1943. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“Introduction.” Talking to India. By E. M. Forster and others. London: Allen and Unwin, 1943.
“As I Please.” A regular column for the Tribune, from December 1943 to February 1945, and again from November 1946 to April 1947. All of the ‘As I Please’ columns can be found in the CEJL.
1944
“In the Firing Line.” Observer. 2 January 1944. (r)
“Tapping the Wheels.” Observer. 16 January 1944. (r)
“Chosen People.” Observer. 30 January 1944. (r)
“A Hundred Up.” Observer. 13 February 1944. (r) CEJL
“Utmost Edge.” Observer. 27 February 1944.
“Wavell on Hilicon.” Observer. 12 March 1944. (r)
“Old Master.” Observer. 26 March 1944. (r)
“Grounds for Dismay.” Observer. 9 April 1944. (r)
“Allies Facing Food Crisis in Germany.” Observer. 15 April 1945.
“Power House.” Observer. 23 April 1944. (r)
“All Change Here.” Observer. 7 May 1944. (r)
“Vessel of Wrath.” Observer. 21 May 1944. (r)
“Survey of ‘Civvy Street.’” Observer. 4 June 1944. (r)
“Behind the Ranges.” Observer. 11 June 1944. (r)
“Temperature Chart.” Observer. 25 June 1944. (r)
“Benefit of Clergy: Some Notes on Salvador Dali.” Written in June 1944. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL (r)
“Return Journey.” Observer. 9 July 1944. (r)
“The Eight Years of War: Spanish Memories.” Observer. 16 July 1944.
“Chinese Miracles.” Observer. 6 August 1944. (r)
“The Children Who Cannot Be Billeted.” Observer. 13 August 1944. (r)
“Puritan Poet.” Observer. 20 August 1944. (r)
“Propaganda and Demotic Speech.” Persuasion. Summer 1944. CEJL
“Back to the Land.” Observer. 3 September 1944. (r)
“New World.” Observer. 17 September 1944. (r)
“Tobias Smollett: Scotland's Best Novelist.” Tribune. 22 September 1944. CEJL
“Arthur Koestler.” Written September 1944. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL
“Burma Roads.” Observer. 1 October 1944. (r)
“Indian Ink.” Observe. 29 October 1944. (r)
“Raffles and Miss Blandish.” Horizon. October 1944. CrE/DD, CE, CEJL
“Money and Virtue.” Tribune. 10 November 1944. (r)
“Poet and Priest.” Observer. 12 November 1944. (r)
“Singing Men.” Observer. 26 November 1944. (r)
“A Controversy: Orwell: Agate.” Manchester Evening News. 30 November and 21 December 1944. CEJL (r)
“Oysters and Brown Stout.” Tribune. 22 December 1944. CEJL
“Spanish Prison.” Observer. 24 December 1944. (r)
“Poet in Darkness.” Observer. 31 December 1944. (r)
“Points of View.” Poetry. December 1944. (r)
1945
“A New Year Message.” Tribune. 5 January 1945. CEJL
“Going Down.” Observer. 14 January 1945. (r)
“Books Vs. Cigarettes.” Tribune. 8 February 1946. SE, CEJL
“Occupation's Effect on French Outlook.” Observer. 4 March 1945.
“Clerical Party May Re-emerge in France: Educational Controversy.” Observer. 11 March 1945.
“De Gaule Intends to Keep Indo-China.” Observer. 18 March 1945.
“Creating Order out of Cologne Chaos.” Observer. 25 March 1945.
“Poetry and the Microphone.” New Saxon Pamphlet. March 1945. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“Future of a Ruined Germany.” Observer. 8 April 1945.
“Bavarian Peasants Ignore the War.” Observer. 22 April 1945.
“Antisemitism in Britain.” Contemporary Jewish Record. April 1945. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“France's Interest in the War Dwindles.” Observer. 6 May 1945.
“Freed Politicians Return to Paris.” Observer. 13 May 1945.
“Danger of Separate Occupation Zones.” Observer. 20 May 1945.
“Joint Control of Reich in Danger.” Observer. 27 May 1945.
“Muffled Voice.” Observer. 10 June 1945. (r)
“Uncertain Fate of Displaced Persons.” Observer. 10 June 1945.
“Man from the Sea.” Observer. 24 June 1945. (r)
“Liberal Intervention Aids Labour.” Observer. 1 July 1945.
“French Farce.” Observer. 8 July 1945. (r)
“So Runs the World.” Observer. 22 July 1945. (r)
“Funny, but not Vulgar.” Leader. 28 July 1945. CEJL
“Tale of a Head.” Observer. 19 August 1945. (r)
“Charles the Great.” Observer. 2 September 1945. (r)
“Satirical Bullseyes.” Tribune. 7 September 1945. (r)
“Pity and Terror.” Observer. 7 October 1945. (r)
“Milton in Striped Trousers.” Tribune. 12 October 1945. (r)
“You and the Atom Bomb.” Tribune. 19 October 1945. CEJL
“What is Science?” Tribune. 26 October 1945. CEJL
“The Green Flag.” Observer. 28 October 1945. (r)
“Good Bad Books.” Tribune. 2 November 1945. SE, CEJL
“Revenge is Sour.” Tribune. 9 November 1945. CEJL
“Cycle of Cathay.” Observer. 11 November 1945. (r)
“D. H. Lawrence's Short Stories.” Tribune. 16 November 1945. (r)
“Teller of Tales.” Observer. 18 November 1945. (r)
“Through a Glass, Rosily.” Tribune. 23 November 1945. CEJL
“Escape or Escapeism?” Tribune. 30 November 1945. (r)
“Catastrophic Gradualism.” Common Wealth Review. November 1945. CEJL
“The British General Election.” Commentary. November 1945.
“A Nipping Air.” Observer. 2 December 1945. (r)
“Freedom of the Park.” Tribune. 7 December 1945. CEJL
“The Sporting Spirit.” Tribune. 14 December 1945. SE, CEJL
“In Defence of English Cooking.” Evening Standard. 15 December 1945. CEJL
“Battle Ground.” Observer. 16 December 1945. (r)
“Nonsense Poetry.” Tribune. 21 December 1945. SE, CEJL
“Old George's Almanac.” Tribune. 28 December 1945. (by Crystal-Gazer Orwell)
“World Affairs, 1945.” Junior. 1945.
1946
“Freedom and Happiness.” Tribune. 4 January 1946. (r)
“Pleasure Spots.” Tribune. 11 January 1946. CEJL
“A Nice Cup of Tea.” Evening Standard. 12 January 1946. CEJL
“The Politics of Starvation.” Tribune. 18 January 1946. CEJL
“On Housing.” Tribune. 25 January 1946. (r)
“Notes on Nationalism.” Polemic. January 1946. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“The Cost of Radio Programmes.” Tribune. 1 February 1946.
“The Moon Under Water.” Evening Standard. 9 February 1946. CEJL
“Decline of the English Murder.” Tribune. 15 February 1946. SE, OR, CEJL
“Words and Henry Miller.” Tribune. 22 February 1946. (r)
“Do Our Colonies Pay?” Tribune. 8 March 1946.
“In Front of Your Nose.” Tribune. 22 March 1946. CEJL
“In Pursuit of Lord Acton.” Tribune. 29 March 1946. (r)
“The Prevention of Literature.” Polemic. March 1946. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Foreign Policies.” Tribune. 5 April 1946. (r)
“Some Thoughts on the Common Toad.” Tribune. 12 April 1946. SE, OR, CEJL
“A Good Word for the Vicar of Bray.” Tribune. 26 April 1946. SE, OR, CEJL
“Politics and the English Language.” Horizon. April 1946. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Confessions of a Book Reviewer.” Tribune. 3 May 1946. SE, CEJL
“Second Thoughts on James Burnham.” Polemic. May 1946. CEJL
“In Defence of P. G. Wodehouse.” Windmill. July 1946. CrE/DD, OR, CE, CEJL
“Why I Write.” Gangrel. Summer 1946. SJ, EYE, OR, CE, CEJL
“The Cost of Letters.” Horizon. September 1946. CEJL
“Politics Versus Literature.” Polemic. September 1946. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Questionnaire: The Cost of Letters.” Horizon. September 1946.
“The Right to Free Expression.” By Randall Swingler with marginal commentary from Orwell. Polemic. September-October 1946.
“Riding Down from Bangor.” Tribune. 22 November 1946. SE, CEJL
“How the Poor Die.” Now. November 1946. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“It Looks Different From Abroad.” New Republic. 2 December 1946.
1947
“Burnham's View of the Contemporary World Struggle.” New Leader. 29 March 1947. CEJL (r)
“Lear, Tolstoy, and the Fool.” Polemic. March 1947. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“The Future of Socialism: IV. Toward European Unity.” Partisan Review. July-August 1947.
“Toward European Unity.” Partisan Review. July-August 1947. CEJL
“In Defence of Comrade Zilliacus.” Written in autumn 1947. CEJL
“Preface.” Animal Farm. (Ukrainian edition) Munich, 1947. CEJL
“Reply to Horizon Questionnaire.” British Thought. New York: Gresham Press, 1947.
1948
“A Lost World.” Observer. 1 February 1948. (r)
“Marx and Russia.” Observer. 15 February 1948. (r)
“Men of the Isles.” Observer. 29 February 1948. (r)
“Down Under.” Observer. 14 March 1948. (r)
“Wilde's Utopia.” Observer. 9 May 1948. (r)
“Mr. Sludge.” Observer. 6 June 1948. (r)
“Britain's Left-Wing Press.” Progressive. June 1948.
“Prime Minister.” Observer. 4 July 1948. (r)
“The Sanctified Sinner.” (Review of ‘The Heart of the Matter’ by Graham Greene) New Yorker. 17 July 1948. (r)
“A Questionable Shape.” Observer. 18 July 1948. (r)
“For Ever Eton.” Observer. 1 August 1948. (r)
“The Writer's Dilemma.” Observer. 22 August 1948. (r)
“Writers and Leviathan.” Politics and Letters. Summer 1948. SJ, EYE, CE, CEJL
“The Defence of Freedom.” Observer. 11 October 1948. (r)
“Britain's Struggle for Survival: The Labor Government After Three Years.” Commentary. October 1948.
“Problem Picture.” Observer. 7 November 1948. (r)
“Culture and the Classes.” Observer. 28 November 1948. (r)
“Introduction.” British Pamphleteers. Vol. 1. Ed. by George Orwell and Reginald Reynolds. London: Allan Wingate, 1948.
1949
“Reflections on Gandhi.” Partisan Review. January 1949. SE, OR, CE, CEJL
“Conrad's Place and Rank in English Letters.” Wiadomosci. 10 April 1949. CEJL
“A Critic Views a Statesman.” New Leader. 14 May 1949.
“Mr. Dickens Sits for His Portrait.” New York Times Book Review. 15 May 1949. (r)
“The Question of the Pound Award.” Partisan Review. May 1949. CEJL
1950
“From the Notebooks of George Orwell.” World Review. June 1950.
“Such, Such Were the Joys.” Partisan Review. September-October 1952. SJ, OR, CEJL
“George Gissing.” London Magazine. June 1960. CEJL
“England Your England.” First published in booklet The Lion and the Unicorn. SJ, EYE, CE, OR
“James Burnham.” (var. title of ‘Second Thoughts on James Burnham’)

Orwell Transcripts of Broadcasts

Those essays which Orwell broadcast on the BBC are noted in the essay section. In addition, there are several compilations of Orwell's wartime radio work.

1. “Orwell, the War Broadcasts”, London: Duckworth: British Broadcasting Corp., 1985.
This was later published in the U. S. with the title “Orwell, the Lost Writings”.
2. “Orwell, the War Commentaries”, London: Duckworth: British Broadcasting Corp., 1985.
This was later published in the U. S. with the same title.

Orwell Essay Collections Published Prior to Death

  1. “Inside the Whale and Other Essays”, London: V. Gollancz ltd., 1940.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Inside the Whale;
    – Charles Dickens;
    – Boys' Weeklies.
  2. “Critical Essays”, London: Secker and Warburg, 1946.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Charles Dickens;
    – Boys' Weeklies;
    – Wells, Hitler and the World State;
    – The Art of Donald McGill;
    – Rudyard Kipling;
    – W. B. Yeats;
    – Benefit of Clergy;
    – Arthur Koestler;
    – Raffles and Miss Blandish;
    – In Defence of P. G. Wodehouse.
  3. American edition of “Critical Essays” — “Dickens, Dali & Others” — Studies in Popular Culture. New York: Reynal & Hitchcock, 1946.

Orwell Essay Collections Published After Death

  1. “Shooting an Elephant, and Other Essays”, London: Secker and Warburg, 1950.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Shooting an Elephant;
    – A Hanging;
    – How the Poor Die;
    – Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool;
    – Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver's Travels;
    – Politics and the English Language;
    – Reflections on Gandhi;
    – The Prevention of Literature;
    – Second Thoughts on James Burnham;
    – Confessions of a Book Reviewer;
    – Books vs. Cigarettes;
    – Good Bad Books;
    – Nonsense Poetry;
    – Riding Down from Bangor;
    – The Sporting Spirit;
    – Decline of the English Murder;
    – Some Thoughts on the Common Toad;
    – A Good Word for the Vicar of Bray.
  2. “England, Your England and Other Essays”, London: Secker & Warburg, 1953.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Why I Write;
    – Writers and Leviathan;
    – North and South (from The Road to Wigan Pier);
    – Notes on Nationalism;
    – Anti-Semitism in Britain;
    – Poetry and the Microphone;
    – Inside the Whale;
    – Marrakech;
    – Looking Back on the Spanish War;
    – Down the Mine (from The Road to Wigan Pier);
    – England Your England.
  3. “Such, Such Were the Joys”, New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1953.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Why I Write;
    – Such, Such Were the Joys;
    – Writers and Leviathan.
    – Anti-Semitism in Britain;
    – Poetry and the Microphone;
    – Marrakech;
    – Looking Back on the Spanish War;
    – Inside the Whale;
    – England Your England.
  4. “A Collection of Essays”, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1954.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Such, Such Were the Joys;
    – Charles Dickens;
    – The Art of Donald McGill;
    – Rudyard Kipling;
    – Raffles and Miss Blandish;
    – Shooting an Elephant;
    – Politics and the English Language;
    – Reflections on Gandhi;
    – Marrakech;
    – Looking Back on the Spanish War;
    – Inside the Whale;
    – England Your England;
    – Boys' Weeklies;
    – Why I Write.
  5. “Selected Essays”, Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 1957.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Inside the Whale;
    – Down the Mine;
    – England Your England;
    – Shooting an Elephant;
    – Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool;
    – Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver's Travels;
    – Politics and the English Language;
    – The Prevention of Literature;
    – Boys' weeklies;
    Reprinted in 1960 with the same title (available on orwell.ru: 'Selected Essays').
    Reprinted in 1962 with title “Inside the Whale”, but not the same as Orwell's 1940 essay collection by the same name.
  6. “Collected Essays” — London: Secker & Warburg, 1961.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Inside the Whale;
    – Shooting an Elephant;;
    – A Hanging;
    – How the Poor Die;
    – Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool;
    – Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver's Travels;
    – Politics and the English Language;
    – The Prevention of Literature;
    – Second Thoughts on James Burnham;
    – Charles Dickens;
    – Boys' Weeklies;
    – Wells, Hitler and the World State;
    – The Art of Donald McGill;
    – W. B. Yeats;
    – Benefit of Clergy;
    – Arthur Koestler;
    – Raffles and Miss Blandish;
    – In Defence of P. G. Wodehouse;
    – Why I Write;
    – Notes on Nationalism;
    – Anti-Semitism in Britain;
    – Poetry and the Microphone;
    – Marrakech;
    – Looking Back on the Spanish War.
  7. “Decline of the English Murder and Other Essays”, Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 1965.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Decline of the English Murder;
    – A Hanging;
    – Benefit of Clergy.
    – How the Poor Die;
    – Rudyard Kipling;
    – Raffles and Miss Blandish;
    – Charles Dickens;
    – The Art of Donald McGill;
    – Notes on Nationalism;
    – Why I Write.
  8. “The Penguin Essays of George Orwell”, Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 1984.
    Contains forty-one pieces, from 1931 to 1949, arranged in chronological order.

Orwell Letter Collections Published After Death

  1. “Some Letters of George Orwell to Cyril Connolly, Richard Rees, Stephen Spender, T. R. Fyvel, and Others.”, Encounter. January 1962.
  2. “George Orwell: Ten ‘Animal Farm’ Letters to his Agent, Leonard Moore.” Bloomington, Ind.: Private Press of Fredric Brewer, 1984.

Orwell Mixed-Genre Collections Published After Death

  1. “The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell”, New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1968.
    The key word here is ‘collected’. This collection is nowhere near complete, but it is the most complete collection available of Orwell's shorter work. Included in the four volumes are essays / articles, book reviews, poetry, letters, and extracts from Orwell's diaries and notebooks. The volumes are titled as follows:
    – Volume I: An Age Like This, 1920-1940;
    – Volume II: My Country Right or Left, 1940-1943;
    – Volume III: As I Please, 1943-1945;
    – Volume IV: In Front of Your Nose, 1945-1950.
  2. “The Orwell Reader, Fiction, Essays, and Reportage” — New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1956.
    Contains the following essays:
    – Shooting an Elephant;
    – A Hanging;
    – How the Poor Die;
    – England Your England;
    – Rudyard Kipling;
    – Politics vs. Literature: an Examination of 'Gulliver's Travels';
    – Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool;
    – In Defense of P. G. Wodehouse;
    – Reflections on Gandhi;
    – Second Thoughts on James Burnham;
    – Politics and the English Language;
    – The Prevention of Literature;
    – Decline of the English Murder;
    – Some Thoughts on the Common Toad;
    – A Good Word for the Vicar of Bray;
    – Why I Write;
    – Such, Such Were the Joys.
    Also contains excerpts from the following Orwell's novels:
    – Burmese Days;
    – Down and Out in Paris and London;
    – A Clergyman's Daughter;
    – Keep the Aspidistra Flying;
    – The Road to Wigan Pier;
    – Homage to Catalonia;
    – Coming Up for Air;
    – Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Orwell Poetry

  1. “Awake young men of England”, Henley and South Oxfordshire Standard. 2 October 1914. BC.
  2. “Kitchener”, Henley and South Oxfordshire Standard. 21 July 1916. BC.
  3. “A Dressed Man and a Naked Man”, Adelphi. October 1933. CEJL, BC.
  4. “Sometimes in the Middle Autumn Days”, Adelphi. March 1933. CEJL, BC.
  5. “Summer-like”, Adelphi. May 1933.
  6. “On a Ruined Farm Near the His Master's Voice Gramophone Factory”, Adelphi. April 1934. CEJL.
  7. “St. Andrew's Day, 1935”, Adelphi. November 1935.
  8. “A Happy Vicar”, Adelphi. December 1936.
  9. “As One Non-Combatant to Another”, Tribune. 18 June 1943. CEJL.

Orwell Letters to the Editor / Editorials

Entries are published letters / editorials only. Titled entries are alphabetized by title, and untitled entries are alphabetized by periodical name. Entries noted “with others” were also signed by others than Orwell. Some entries are included in the CEJL.

Orwell Works Edited

  1. “Talking to India”, London: Allen and Unwin, 1943.
  2. “British Pamphleteers. Vol 1” — (co-edited with Reginald Reynolds) London: Wingate, 1948.

Orwell Standard Edition

  1. A standard edition of Orwell's works is published by Secker & Warburg, London. Titles available include all of Orwell's fiction and nonfiction books, as well as “The Lion and the Unicorn”, “Collected Essays”, and the CEJL.

Orwell Manuscripts

The few surviving Orwell manuscripts reside in the Orwell Archive, at University College, London. In addition, what remains of the original manuscript of Nineteen Eighty-Four has been published in book form:

  1. “Nineteen Eighty-Four”, the Facsimile of the Extant Manuscript. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich; Weston, Mass.: M & S Press, 1984, Edited by Peter H. Davison.

Orwell Bibliographies

Annotation sources are as follows:

– I. R. Willison “George Orwell: Some Materials for a Bibliography.” School of Librarianship, London University, 1953.
Willison later collaborated on a bibliography in Bulletin of Bibliography with Ian Angus. KC.
– Zoltan and William White Zeke “George Orwell: A Selected Bibliography.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 23 (1961): 100-14.
A list of Orwell's books, collected essays, articles and reviews in periodicals, poems and works edited, from 1930 to 1952. AB.
– Zoltan and William White Zeke “Orwelliana.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 23 (1961): 140-44.
A list of books, chapters in books, periodical articles and reviews of books by and about Orwell. AB.
– Zoltan and William White Zeke “Orwelliana.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 23 (1962): 166-68.
A list of reviews of books by and about Orwell, obituaries, portraits, late essays and reviews by Orwell, films, radio and television adaptations. AB.
– Jennifer McDowell “George Orwell: Bibliographical Addenda.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 23 (1963): 224-29.
A supplement to Zeke and White which lists Orwell's articles and reviews in periodicals and books, and letters of reply to his work. AB.
– Jennifer McDowell “George Orwell: Bibliographical Addenda.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 24 (1963): 19-24.
A list of letters on Orwell's work; books, pamphlets and theses; bibliographies; chapters in books and periodical articles on Orwell. AB.
– Jennifer McDowell “George Orwell: Bibliographical Addenda.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 24 (1963): 36-40.
A list of reviews of Orwell's books, broadcasts, obituaries, portraits, and more articles and reviews in periodicals by Orwell. AB.
– Ian and Ian Angus Willison “George Orwell: Bibliographical Addenda.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 24 (1965): 180-87.
A supplement to Zeke and White and McDowell's bibliographies, which lists Orwell's prefaces and introductions; articles, reviews and letters in periodicals; unsigned contributions; and letters on Orwell's work. AB.
– Jeffrey Meyers “George Orwell: A Bibliography.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 31 (1974): 117-21.
A bibliography of criticism on Orwell which lists three hundred books and articles in English, French, Italian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Serbo-Croat, Hungarian and Japanese. AB.
– Jeffrey Meyers “George Orwell: A Selected Checklist.” Modern Fiction Studies. 21 (1975): 133-36.
A supplement to the earlier bibliography which lists an additional eighty-five books and articles on Orwell. AB.
– Jeffrey Meyers and Valerie Meyers “George Orwell: An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism.” New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1977.
This lists books, articles, chapters in books, and reviews about Orwell's work from all over the world. Each item is accompanied by a brief synopsis and occasionally evaluative comment.
– “George Orwell” — The English Novel, Twentieth Century Criticism. Vol. 2, Twentieth Century Novelists. Ed. Paul Schlueter and June Schlueter. Athens, Ohio: Swallow Press, 1982. 243-52.
Lists over two hundred citations to critical material on Orwell. TK.
– Thomas Jackson Rice “George Orwell.” English Fiction, 1900-1950: Individual Authors: Joyce to Woolf: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1983.
This is both a primary and secondary bibliography on Orwell, with brief annotations. Two hundred eighty-seven critical items are listed. TK.
– Karel A. Thomas “George Orwell: A Pre-1984 Bibliography of Criticism, 1975-1983.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 41 (1984): 133-47.
A secondary bibliography of works from 1975-1983, partially annotated. Divided into four sections: Books, Sections of Books, Periodical Articles, and Dissertations (1955-1983). KC.
– Paul Schlueter “Trends in Orwell Criticism, 1968-1983.” College Literature. 11.1 (1984): 94-112.
Schlueter's original secondary bibliography. KC.
– Paul Schlueter “Trends in Orwell Criticism, 1968-1984.” Critical Essays on George Orwell. Ed. Bernard Oldsey and Joseph Browne. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986.
An expanded version of Schlueter's original secondary bibliography. KC.
– Paul Schlueter “Supplement to ‘Trends in Orwell Criticism, 1968-1984’ (through 1990).” Bulletin of Bibliography. 49 (1992): 115-26.
A secondary bibliography of works in English mainly from 1984-1990. Not annotated. KC.
– L. Brander: “George Orwell” (1954) NA
– John Atkins: “George Orwell” (1955) NA
– George Woodcock: “The Crystal Spirit” (1966) NA
– Robert A. Lee: “Orwell's Fiction” (1969) NA
– B. T. Oxley: “George Orwell” (1969) NA
– Raymond Williams: “Orwell” (1971) NA
– Peter Stansky and W. Abrahams: “The Unknown Orwell” (1972) NA
– David L. Kubal: “Outside the Whale: George Orwell's Art and Politics” (1972) NA
– Roberta Kalechofsky: “George Orwell” (1973) NA
– Raymond Williams: “George Orwell: A Collection of Critical Essays” (1974) NA
– Alex Zwerdling: “Orwell and the Left” (1974) NA
– William Steinhoff: “George Orwell and the Origins of 1984” (1975) NA
– C. Small: “Road to Miniluv” (1975) NA
– Jeffrey Meyers (as ed.): “The Critical Heritage” (1975) NA
– Jeffrey Meyers (as ed.): “George Orwell” (1975) NA
– Jeffrey Meyers: “A Reader's Guide to George Orwell” (1977) NA
– Peter Stansky and W. Abrahams: “The Transformation” (1979) NA
– B. Crick: “George Orwell: A Life” (1980) NA
– J. R. Hammond: “A George Orwell Companion” (1982) NA
– D. Patai: “The Orwell Mystique: A Study in Male Ideology” (1984) NA
– W. F. Bolton: “The Language of 1984” (1984) NA
– P. Reilly: “George Orwell: The Age's Adversary” (1986) NA
– Courtney T. Wemyss and Alexey Ugrinskiy (ed.): “George Orwell” (1987) NA
– P. Buitenhuis and I. B. Nadel: “George Orwell: A Reassessment” (1988) NA
– Michael Shelden: “The Authorized Biography” (1991) NA
– Peter Hobley Davison: “George Orwell: A Literary Life” (1996) NA
– Jeffrey Meyers: “Orwell: Wintry Conscience of a Generation” (2000) NA

Orwell Biographies

Included the most important Orwell biographies, as well as some works by friends and relatives, and works with a range of viewpoints.

– V. S. Pritchett “George Orwell.” New Statesman. 28 January 1950: 96.
Pritchett's sympathetic and insightful obituary, which appeared a week after Orwell's death, was extremely influential in establishing the personal reputation of the tall emaciated man with a face scored by the marks of physical suffering. Pritchett mentions his masochism, says he had gone native in his own country, and calls him a kind of saint, the guilty conscience of the educated and privileged man. AB.
– Paul Potts “Don Quixote on a Bicycle: In Memoriam, George Orwell, 1903-1950.” London Magazine. March 1957: 39-47.
A memoir and character-sketch of Orwell. Potts emphasizes his kindness, independence, courage, integrity, Englishness, and recalls his capacity for hard work, his taste in food, his conversation, and his hobbies. He describes his reaction to the death of his wife and his care of his child. AB.
– Rayner Heppenstall “Four Absentees.” London: Barrie and Rockcliff, 1960.
1. On the whole, hostile anecdotal reminisces by an acquaintance who once shared a flat with Orwell in London: Orwell emerges as a prejudiced eccentric. PPF.
2. ...Heppenstall traces his friendship with Orwell ...includes the anecdotes on Orwell he had previously published, and comments on their effect on the public. AB.
– Avril Dunn “My Brother, George Orwell.” Twentieth Century. March 1961: 255-61.
A useful and lucid memoir by Orwell's sister, recorded for the BBC in 1960. She describes Orwell's pleasant childhood and happy, though reserved, family relationship; the effects on his character of life in Burma, his early writing and decision to make it his life-work, his life on Jura and his illness. AB)
– Julian Symons “Orwell — A Reminiscence.” London Magazine. September 1963: 35-49.
An account of a friendship with Orwell which began in 1944, with descriptions of his character, physical appearance and behavior. Symons stresses Orwell's reticence about personal matters, his extreme integrity and honesty, his generosity, and his directness of manner which almost amounted to gaucherie. Some extracts from Orwell's letters are included, one of them a response to Symons' review of 1984. Symons characterizes Orwell as a man struggling to overcome childhood neuroses, who became a better person by sheer effort. AB.
– Anthony Powell “George Orwell: A Memoir.” Atlantic Monthly. October 1967: 62-68.
Perhaps the most vivid personal reminiscence of Orwell, this essay describes him as ascetic, intransigent, moralistic, hard to know. Powell captures many physical aspects of Orwell: his voice, carefully controlled not to sound “public school”; his clothes, always shabby corduroys and tweeds. Powell describes his persecution mania and his solemnity; his fondness for Victorian atmosphere in places he lived; his devoted care of his child. AB.
– Peter and William Abrahams Stansky “The Unknown Orwell.” London: Constable, 1972.
This is a scholarly study of the first thirty years of Orwell's life, from his birth in 1903 to the publication of Down and Out in Paris and London in 1933. The authors have painstakingly researched his school days at St. Cyprian's and at Eton, his years in Burma, and the laborious literary apprenticeship he underwent in Paris and London before the publication of his first book. GOC.
– Jacintha Buddicom “Eric and Us: A Remembrance of George Orwell.” London: Leslie Frewin, 1974.
This is a sympathetic account of Orwell's boyhood and in particular of his friendship with the Buddicom family during the years 1914-22. It is particularly valuable for its insight into the Blair family background at Henley and Shiplake and for the evidence it offers of Orwell's early literary ambitions. There is much interesting material on his boyhood reading and on the literary influences which helped to shape his distinctive style and approach. The volume also contains three early poems and a number of hitherto unpublished letters. GOC.
– Peter and William Abrahams Stansky “Orwell: The Transformation.” London: Constable, 1979.
1. Biography from the publication of his first novel to his involvement in the Spanish Civil War. PPF.
2. A sequel to the authors' The Unknown Orwell... TK.
3. ...they carefully followed Orwell's footsteps, sometimes giving more detail that Crick can, and they were able to interview some persons, such as Mrs. Vaughan Wilkes, who had died before Crick began his study. So Stansky and Abrahams usefully supplement Crick's biography... PREF.
4. (It is particularly valuable for its account of his friendships during this crucial period and for the sensitive portrayal of his wife and her influence on his career. GOC.
– Bernard Crick “George Orwell: A Life.” London: Secker & Warburg, 1980.
1. This is the basic resource for anyone needing information on Orwell's life and work. PREF.
2. The authorized biography, objective and unspeculative – the first biographer to be given access to private papers held by Orwell's widow. PPF.
3. The most comprehensive... biographical work on Orwell thus far. TK.
4. Bernard Crick has achieved an extremely readable and straightforward account of Orwell's life... a fascinating and erudite biography which illuminates Orwell's own writings and helps the reader to understand the complexities of his life and friendships. GOC.
– T. R. Fyvel “George Orwell: A Personal Memoir.” London: Macmillan, 1982.
1. (An account by a close friend upholding Orwell as a secular saint and arguing that in Nineteen Eighty-Four, out of his private nightmare he produced a book prophetically related to the public problems of the age. PPF.
2. Primarily covers the last ten years of Orwell's life. TK.

2001

____BD____
As source for this work, I've used the ‘George Orwell Published’ by Kara C. Chiodo ‘goldbug’ (OU).
That pages are not available any more, but I think that the following is the new Kara's URI:
URI: http://students.ou.edu/C/Kara.C.Chiodo-1/orwell.html

____
Machine-readable version: O. Dag
Last modified on: 2015-09-24


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